Interview Transcript: Episode 1


I had an lovely reader on Reddit transcribe the video interview. Her belief is that many would rather read the transcript. This interview is from the murder all the way through to her burial and back home.

Here it is. Blessings to you today!

WARNING: The following transcript contains descriptions of sexual and physical violence.  Please use discretion.


INTERVIEWER: 

Jodie is here today because she has a story to tell. Because she has unfinished business. Because there is more that could be done and should be done. She wants this 30 year old cold case to gain traction and hopefully get some kind of justice for the murdered woman of this story and her family. 

In 1968, when Jodie was 4 years old, she witnessed her father and another man rape and murder a woman in a motel room and discard her body like trash. Over the years, Jodie has pieced together the memories and facts of the story to bring forth justice and healing. 

Today, part one, we’re going to explore the day of the murder, the timeline, the details, and the facts of the case. 

Let’s set the scene, Jodie: 

Tell us a bit about your life leading up to the day of the murder.

Jodie: 

I had a brother and two sisters. My dad was 29 years old and I think that made my mom 27. We lived in a dinky little house together. 

My dad didn’t work a lot in those days and my mom worked full time, which gave him kind of free reign of the house. His best friend, Craig, (his surname is really Donald, I learned later, but we called him Craig) he was around always in those times. Dad would drink from the time he got out of bed until his legs betrayed him in the evening and went down.

There was a lot of abuse in our house. He was very physically violent with my mother and he was sexually abusive with all of us kids. It was kind of like a child gangbang scene with him and Craig and that was our days. 

Interviewer: 

What was the town like? What was the population?

Jodie: 

The town was tiny. The population at that time, well, I think the entirety of Clark County was about 37,000 people. Today it’s 800,000, so it was a very different place. It was a sleepy little town, quite honestly. 

Interviewer: 

Yeah, wow. So you went over a little bit about some family background, a history of violence. You have memories of your father partying, drinking a lot. So his character kind of—it made sense. For what happened on the day of the murder.

Jodie: 

Right. He’d stay out a lot. I can remember nights where he and Craig would be gone and he’d crawl through the window in the middle of the night because for some reason he wouldn’t have a key. It was just always chaos in the house. I remember Mom screaming and Dad coming through the window and getting something in the middle of the night and leaving.

He was just a creature of weirdness. 

Like, there was nothing ever the same in our house every time. They fought constantly, all the time. And so it was just chaos all the time. So dad was coming and going all the time, mom went to work regularly, but it wasn’t uncommon for him to be out all night.

Interviewer: 

Speaking of fights, what was your very first memory of this day?

Jodie: 

So my first memory is when I’m in the car. It’s a blue car that has black seats and there’s four doors. [Years] later I wrote to my uncle and I learned that my parents had gotten in a fight that day. My dad in the morning had come home and got in a fight and took me with him. My mom probably made him. I don’t really know. 

The first memory I have is being in the car and we’re driving down the highway. 

Interviewer: 

And it was not uncommon that your dad would sometimes take you, or have you?

Jodie: 

You know, honestly, we didn’t go with my dad very much.

Interviewer: 

So it was out of the ordinary?

Jodie: 

Right. It was out of the ordinary. I didn’t drive around with Dad; Dad did his own thing. Unless he was, you know, fucking around with us at home. We didn’t go with him.  

The only other time I remember being alone with him is when I got [hit with] a rock in the head and he took me to the hospital and we were alone then. But most of the time, you didn’t go with Dad anywhere. You just stayed at home and waited for him. 

Interviewer: 

Okay, so you’re in a car. Is it your car? 

Jodie: 

Well, I learned later. I don’t know whose car [it was] at first, but obviously we’ll talk about that more tomorrow. The car that we’re in is a big blue [car]. I learned later that it was an Oldsmobile. All I remember is it was blue with a black interior. It was a big car.

I remember looking over at Dad and it was really sunny out. He was smoking a cigarette but he was preoccupied. I always watched my dad a lot because he was a scary man. I just remember kind of being nervous driving down the road with what was going on, because you could tell he was agitated and that was never a good thing.

Interviewer: 

So you’re traveling in the car together and you’re headed where?

Jodie: 

Well, I didn’t know where. But just a little bit down the road, I5 is right over there. We had come from—lived in—the Heights. And so we turned very quickly. We were only in the car for a few minutes. Like by the time I even figure out, even think, I barely think about anything. And we’re turning into this River Side Inn Motel.

Interviewer: 

Were you familiar with the hotel? 

Jodie: 

No, I’d never been there before. 

Interviewer: 

Okay, so you arrive at the hotel, you park. Can you give us a layout of the scene, the parking lot, the front desk, if you can see anything? 

Jodie: 

Yeah, so actually, we came in and there’s a building here and then there’s this breezeway area where the office was and then there was a building here. 

They kind of sat like this and the car parked like this and there was a white plastic chair right here. Dad put me in the chair and then went into the office area. 

Interviewer: 

Okay, could you see into the office area from where you were in the parking lot?

Jodie: 

No. I just remember Dad put me in the chair and across the street was a railroad track and I kind of got lost in thinking. I remember thinking it would be cool if a train went by so I was kinda thinking about that and I didn’t really see. I mean I looked at Dad, but you wouldn’t get out of the chair and follow him if he told you to stay there. 

Interviewer: 

Right, So you stood there.  

Jodie: 

I never went in the office. 

Interviewer: 

Okay.

Jodie: 

I just knew it was an office. It was pretty clear that it was an office. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. So what’s the next thing you remember?

Jodie: 

This blonde lady comes out and talks to me and it seems like she comes up from this side. She’s asking me if I’m Stan’s kid or whatever and we don’t talk for very long at all.

Then, Dad comes out from the office and he’s angry at both of us. He takes me by the hand and I remember just kind of tiptoeing quickly because I couldn’t really touch the ground very much. He walked me down the sidewalk there in front of the motel and opened the door. He swatted my butt and put me in the door and shut the door and left. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. So you were left alone in the hotel room.

Jodie: 

Right. 

Interviewer: 

Had it been occupied? What did you notice once you were inside? 

Jodie: 

So once I went in there, the room was pretty dark. I remember it being really sunny outside but the room was really dark. I was just really scared. But it seemed like they’d been partying there.

We had lots of parties at the house so I could tell that people had been in there partying because there were a bunch of bottles and stuff.

Interviewer: 

So you were familiar with it. 

Jodie: 

Yeah, and there was a bed and I remember looking around.  There were two nightstands. There was a bathroom in the back and I remember assessing everything because I was scared and wasn’t sure if somebody was in there with me. 

Interviewer: 

So you were taking note of your surroundings.

Jodie: 

Right, I always did. 

Interviewer: 

Yeah. Okay. So how long do you think you were in the room before they returned? 

Jodie: 

You know, it felt like to me an hour and a half but I don’t know because you’re a kid, right? So I can’t really know. But I do know that I was in there long enough to move away from the bed, because I remember the feeling of the bedspread. 

That scratchy weird feeling. 

I remember at some point thinking the safest place would be for me to go up against the wall. And so I remember going up against the wall. 

Just waiting for somebody to come back. 

Interviewer: 

So you were still positioned…

Jodie: 

…with my back up against the wall. I remember thinking if I can get my back as tight against the wall as I could that it was the safest place for me.

Interviewer: 

Which means that you probably could see the entirety of the room. 

Jodie: 

Right. Like the door was right here and I sat right against the wall right there, because when they come in I’m pegged up against the door. I remember that feeling of having that wall behind my back. 

Interviewer: 

Yeah. Yeah. So you scooted up against the wall and a short time later who comes into the room?

Jodie: 

Well, they all three do now. Craig’s with them, but I don’t know that Craig is there yet until they all come into the room.

Interviewer: 

Until you see him in the room?

Jodie: 

Exactly. They’re kind of laughing and having fun and Craig’s kind of carrying her in his arms and I can tell they’re just going to party. I knew what partying was because I had been around it my whole little life. Then, I was happy, because I thought everything was going to be okay. Because they kind of came in happy and then there was music in the room and they were drinking.

There was like this, I don’t know, there was some area over here that had all kinds of bottles and that kind of thing. So they were starting to party.

Interviewer: 

Right, and you mentioned earlier that you were familiar with Craig. 

Jodie: 

Oh, he was always around. Yeah. It was just Dad’s friend. He was always with us.

Interviewer: 

But to be clear, this is the first time you were introduced to this blonde woman?

Jodie: 

Yes. I never met her before. 

I never knew my dad to be with another woman except my mom. 

Interviewer: 

So do you remember any feelings at this point? you were you said you were feeling a little bit relieved that they were back?

Jodie: 

Right, we were just going to party because I can remember, there were times in the house where you’d just stay down the hall and watch the adults party. And so I was going to stay pegged up against the wall and watch.

Interviewer: 

Okay, you know what to do. 

Jodie: 

Right, just be quiet.

Interviewer:  

So, what happens next? What’s your next memory?

Jodie: 

This lady comes over and sits down next to me, and she puts her feet back like this. She was a little lady and she had a skirt on because I just remember her feet being over here. She had a purse and she sat down and put it on the ground and she was really kind. We looked through her purse. I don’t remember anything that was in the purse, but I remember her purse and I remember her opening it and it was just sweet. I don’t remember what she said to me. I just remember that I got to play in her purse and then she got up and went back and partied but left her purse with me.

Interviewer: 

Okay. So this could have gone on for a few hours or a few minutes. You probably don’t have the [memory of the time frame].

Jodie: 

I don’t really remember. I don’t remember until my dad is mad about something.

Interviewer: 

Okay. So the air in the room changes. 

Jodie: 

Yes, definitely. Dad’s just kind of raging and I honestly don’t remember a ton other than all of a sudden he starts attacking this lady. 

Interviewer: 

Okay, and what’s her reaction? 

Jodie: 

Well, what’s weird is I don’t really remember anything except that he takes his hand and he shoves her down on the bed and he holds her tight. She’s starting to scream now and he’s got her pegged to the bed with his right hand and with his left hand he pushes her skirt up and is getting her ready, you know, to rape her. And I had been raped by them. So I knew.

Interviewer: 

You knew what was happening? 

Jodie: 

I mean I knew what was going on, right? I knew she was going to be raped and that’s the next thing I remember.

Interviewer: 

Okay, and you were probably scared by this point.

Jodie:

I was terrified, because anytime dad got angry somebody was getting hurt. You know what I mean? And she was getting hurt, because I knew that kind of hurt. So I knew she was getting hurt. So sure, I was scared then because it changed.

Interviewer:

Right, and you mentioned that she was screaming.

Jodie: 

She was.

Interviewer: 

And what do you remember thinking about that? 

Jodie: 

At that time not much. I just watched in silence. 

Interviewer: 

You were probably immobilized with fear. So after he rapes her, what happens next? 

Jodie: 

I don’t have a full roll of [memory], it’s just a snapshot of him there. And then the next thing I remember is her scooting up on the bed. She is scooting backwards away from him and she’s absolutely screaming at him. I remember thinking that she’s telling them, “You’re going to get in trouble for this”, and I don’t remember exactly what she said. I just knew that she was going to tell on him.

Interviewer: 

Right. And probably [you thought] you don’t talk to my father that way because it’s dangerous.

Jodie: 

I knew she was going to be in trouble. Exactly. I didn’t know what kind of trouble. I’d never seen a woman scream like that. My mom screamed, but not in those days. Later in our life my mom screamed a lot. When I was little, mom didn’t scream so much, not like that. She did later in life, but not as much when I was little. I had never seen a lady scream like her. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. Okay. What is your next memory, the next snapshot of that?

Jodie: 

Next, Craig had been over here the whole time. I was over here on the wall. And Craig had been back here [by the bathroom]. It was really dark back there like in front of the bathroom area. There was a table here and she was on the bed. I remember the next thing is he’s behind her and he’s holding her arms here and here *gestures to upper arms* and he’s holding her back and she’s facing my father. 

Interviewer: 

So Craig is holding her arms? 

Jodie: 

And she’s still screaming. But he’s holding her back. Craig was 6’5″, so he’s a huge dude. And so in that room that was kind of an awful sight because he was just so huge and she was little… and, you know, holding her back like that. Then Dad stepped up.

My father always wore a hunting knife in those days. 

I later learned that he knifed people in parking lots and whatever. He was a hillbilly; he’s from Tennessee. He slit her throat with that knife, and I didn’t see a lot of blood because her head actually went forward and they just laid her down [on the bed] immediately. 

The next thing I remember is her feet coming out from the bed. She didn’t have any shoes or socks or anything on, and her feet… I just remember staring at her feet. 

Until the next thing I remember.

I just remember staring at her feet because from where I was that’s the only thing you could see extending from the bed. I didn’t see her anymore. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. So Craig had had her under the arms, and then your father had grabbed her feet and they both placed her onto the bed?

Jodie: 

Right. Exactly, yeah. And she probably didn’t weigh that much, so it was easy for them I’m sure.

But I do remember her feet extending from the bed. 

Because they were bare feet, and that stayed with me for most of my life. Bare feet bothered the shit out of me my whole life. But anyway, that’s another thing. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. So what happens next? 

Jodie: 

So the order of things now, I can’t exactly be certain of. When memories come back, they don’t play like a movie…like you don’t go back like a movie…it has taken me my whole life to get there. So I can’t be certain of what happens next, but they are in the bathroom. 

I know they’re in the bathroom, but I don’t remember them carrying her there or anything like that. Then, at some point in that room, my father comes to me and puts the knife in my right hand. 

And I remember this because it is super heavy and then… he walks me in that bathroom. They had her in the tub and the water’s going over her neck. 

I don’t have to go in the bathroom, but he makes me stand at the door, holding that knife, watching them. 

Then, at some point after that, the front door is open because I remember the front door being opened. The car now is turned around, because we pulled in headlong. I remember looking at the car when I was sitting in that chair, but when the door opened the car had been turned around, and the trunk was open.

And so then, I remember Dad coming back in and they carried her out, but she had been wrapped in a bedspread. I remember this bedspread thing going in the back of the car [trunk] and my dad took me out and opened the back door and told me to get in. It was hard to do because that car was tall for me.

Interviewer:

You were that little? 

Jodie: 

Right. But I got in. The thing that I hated was that she was in there, and I didn’t know she was dead because I didn’t know what “dead” was. So I was scared she was going to reach through. I remember being terrified that she was going to somehow get through that seat and grab me. I was terrified she was gonna grab me. 

Interviewer: 

You remember really feeling that [fear].

Jodie: 

Yeah. All I remember is that. I don’t know why I thought somehow she was going to get through.

Interviewer: 

So you began to pull out. Who is driving? 

Jodie: 

Well, Dad’s driving, and Craig looks over at him. In fact, when I went and talked to Craig, I told him that I remembered. He looked at Dad and he grabbed his face and said, “Stan, why did you do that?” And he was crying.

Interviewer: 

Who was crying?

Jodie: 

Craig was crying. My dad didn’t say anything, but I do remember Craig saying, “Stan, why did you do that?”

Interviewer: 

So you are now pulled back onto highway 14. 

Jodie: 

The highway was right in front of us. The highway is right there. 

Interviewer: 

And what was the highway like? Was it heavily populated? Was there a lot of traffic, or was it pretty empty? 

Jodie: 

No, the whole time I was sitting in that chair, no car went by.

Interviewer: You didn’t see any cars? 

Jodie: 

No, there were no cars. No trains. 

I really wanted that train.

Interviewer: 

Was this a new development, or was this a really old road?

Jodie: 

What I learned later is that the road actually had only been there since 1968. So, it was a very relatively new highway, but I didn’t know that then, of course. I learned that later. We’ll talk about that tomorrow. 

Yes, it was not a well-traveled road. It didn’t take you very many places, just up the bridge. 

Interviewer: 

But you were familiar with traveling on it?

Jodie: 

Well sure, because of the next exit. I think it was the next exit, back in those days. I just remember seeing Lisa Road because that road was the road that would take us home. And that [road] was only a mile from there. My grandma lived there too. Later I learned my grandma actually worked at that hotel we went to, but we’ll talk about that tomorrow too.

So I remember sitting in the back of the car. When I saw Lisa Road and we passed Lisa Road, I knew we weren’t going home. I remember just kind of having a sinking feeling that we weren’t going home. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. Did you know or did you have an idea of where you were headed or  you don’t remember?

Jodie: 

No, I really didn’t.

Interviewer: 

So, what’s the next thing you do remember ?

Jodie: 

The next thing I remember is being up at our property. My parents had 40 acres that we didn’t live on yet. They bought that property in 1967 and they were building a house on it. And I did know our property, because I knew we were sitting in front of the house. Well, the house later sat behind that. There’s a field right beneath where the house was, and we were sitting up on the edge of where the field started. The next thing I remember is Dad and Craig walking beside the car this way with that package.

Interviewer: 

And by package, you mean the woman wrapped in a bedspread?

Jodie:  

Yeah. I remember seeing the bedspread go by.

Interviewer:

Did you know she was in there? 

Jodie: 

Yeah, I knew she was in there.

Interviewer: 

And so you see them walk alongside the car, and then what?

Jodie: 

Then they went down the hill, but I didn’t get up and out of the seat or anything. I only saw them here and I remember thinking I was glad I got to stay in the car, but that’s all I remember of that.

Interviewer: 

OK.  So they disappeared out of sight? 

Jodie: 

Right, and I don’t stand up or anything. I just stay sitting down. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. So what happens next? In your memory. 

Jodie: 

The next thing I remember is then being at my grandma’s house back in town now, which is about… I guess it’s 15 miles back to town. We were at Grandma’s house and she lived in a small house, but there was a spigot and the hose came straight out. There’s a mailbox right here, and Dad had the car here, and the trunk was open. I just stood there watching him blowing the back of the car out. So we’re cleaning the car out. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. You had just remained in the backseat. 

Jodie: 

No, I was standing outside with him.

Interviewer: Oh, you were watching him. 

Jodie: 

Yeah. I was standing right next to him while we were blowing this out. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. Do you remember seeing blood?

Jodie:  

You know, I don’t really remember. I remember the water flowing out of the trunk though, and I remember it falling down onto the gravel because there was a lot of water. Yeah, but I don’t really remember if there was blood.

Interviewer: 

And back then, was a trunk covered in carpet like they are today? Or was it metal?

Jodie: 

I don’t know, it was probably metal. I mean, it seems like it was just metal in there.

Interviewer: 

Okay. So you’re at your grandmother’s car. And to be clear, you’re cleaning the car, which is her car. At her property. 

Jodie: 

Yes. Exactly. I learned later that that was Grandma’s car, but I didn’t know that then of course. Maybe I did. I don’t know. When the memory came back I didn’t remember that it was her car. 

Interviewer:

Is Craig with you this point?

Jodie: 

No, it’s just me and Dad.

Interviewer: Okay, is [Craig] back at the property?

Jodie:

I assume. Yeah. I don’t know. I have no idea.

Interviewer: 

You don’t have any memory of that. Okay. So what happens then?

Jodie: 

Well, so I have this memory of me and Dad being back at our little house on Delaware Lane and he’s got this white package, which I actually know is the knife. He goes in the very first bedroom and there’s this hidden space that he moves a tile over or something, and puts this knife up there. Later, I told my mom that and she said, “I can’t believe you know about that. Your dad hid everything up there.” 

Like records. He was a weirdo.

Anything that was important to him he put up there, and I remember him putting the knife up there. 

Interviewer:

Okay, so it was probably an area like a crawl space?

Jodie:

Right, yes, exactly. Because in the first bedroom we had a closet. 

Interviewer: 

Okay, so you have that memory. Then what is the next flash that you remember?

Jodie: 

I don’t actually remember anything else until it’s late at night.

Interviewer: 

So the sun has gone down at this point. 

Jodie: 

It’s dark. It’s so dark and I’m sitting in this…now I’m in a gold car with black seats and it’s a two door [car]. The guys are working out in front of me because the headlights are on. Right now, we’re in the bottom of the field though. We’re not up above like we were when we first came in.

Interviewer: 

But you’re aware of the fact that you’re back on the property. 

Jodie:  

Yeah. I knew we were down at the bottom of the field. We went up there as a family, because that was our property. We were building a house. And so I knew we were down [in the field] because there was this really cool tree right by where they were working. 

Me and my brother used to climb that tree, and there was this limb, and we were so little that we’d sit up there for hours on that limb. 

Interviewer: 

OK, so you were pretty familiar with the area and the surroundings. 

Jodie: 

Very familiar, because the car was actually parked right at that tree. And they were working ahead, which is where Dad made that dump site. 

Interviewer: 

And what do you mean by working? How did you understand it at that age? 

Jodie:

They had shovels or something. Like, they had tools. I remember them having tools.

Interviewer: 

You could see them in view of the headlights, doing whatever? You remained in the car?

Jodie:

Right, exactly. I remember standing up in the back seat on this side, watching them. 

Interviewer: 

Okay. So what happens in your memory next? 

Jodie: 

Then the next thing I remember is being woken up. So obviously, I had gone to sleep because I was frightened. When they were coming at me, I couldn’t see if it was Dad or Craig and I can remember saying, “Are you Dad or are you Craig?”

It was Dad coming in, and he was dangling a necklace in my face.

Interviewer: 

Coming into the backseat, is that what you mean?

Jodie:

Yeah, he was coming into the backseat. My dad’s a diabetic.  He would go into reactions often. And so I was used to him being in a reaction. He was acting goofy, or drunk, or something, but he was really being weird. 

He was dangling this thing in my face. 

And then if I was sitting here, and the seat is here, he put his head here *gestures to lap* and is on his stomach. Then his feet went up to the window here, and he put his hand underneath me right here, which was frightening a little bit because I wasn’t sure if he was going to touch me, but he didn’t. 

He passed out and went to sleep.

Then Craig’s driving now, and the next thing I remember is looking at Craig because Craig was a big man and I could remember seeing the lights kind of in front of him.

I was just super happy that we were going home.

Interviewer: 

You could see his silhouette? 

Jodie:

Yeah, I could see his silhouette. I couldn’t see above him because I was little, so I couldn’t see the road or anything. I just knew that we were going home at that point.

Interviewer:  

The clues of the scene would have led you to believe that this was kind of the end of the day. Your dad’s passed out, you must be headed back home finally.

Jodie:

Right, we had to be going home. Yeah. It was late by now. 

Interviewer:  

And do you remember arriving home? 

Jodie:

I do, actually. I remember that whole ride home because my legs…my dad was on my legs, and my legs hurt so bad by the time we got home that they didn’t work. They were all prickly and they just hurt super bad.

Interviewer:  

Because they had probably fallen asleep from your dad’s weight.

Jodie:

Exactly.

Yes. And so I remember we came in, we were pulling in, Mom was in the door. The door was open, and she was waiting for us. 

Interviewer:

Okay. Do you remember feeling any way, or do you remember the reaction from your mother? 

Jodie:

The next thing I remember is Dad laying on the couch. 

I’m standing there and my mom is hysterical because it’s her Stan. She’s hysterical.

Interviewer: 

Is your dad unconscious on the couch?

Jodie:

Yeah, he’s unconscious. They could not wake him up. 

Interviewer:

So how does he get from the car to the couch? 

Jodie:

You know, I’m assuming Craig carried him. I don’t really remember, and it seems to me that Craig might have carried me in too, because I just remember standing. I just remember now, we’re all in the living room. 

I don’t really remember walking in there, because I remember being in the living room thinking my legs didn’t work. I wasn’t sure how to get down the hall. 

I really just wanted to get down the hall. 

Interviewer:

And what was down the hall?

Jodie:

My room. But I really wanted my mom to look at me. I remember that. 

She never did. 

Interviewer:

And ask, “Where have you been?”, and “Are you okay?” 

Jodie:

No, and so…that’s all I remember. I think that I scooted down the hall, quite honestly, because it took me a long time to get through that… kind of…I don’t really exactly remember, but I remember thinking that I couldn’t get down there. 

I just wanted to get out of the way from everybody. 

Interviewer:

Okay, so you don’t have any memory of getting back to your bedroom?

Jodie:

I really don’t. I remember being in my room though. I do remember being in my room, because I’m terrified. I remember pegging myself up against the wall. The house is really quiet, because Dad has to go to the hospital where he is admitted for seven days. He damn near killed himself through all that day, being a diabetic.

Then I just remember my mom coming in,some time much later. And she’s angry with me. 

And I can’t answer her questions, because I don’t know. 

I remember her hitting me in the head and just telling me to go to sleep. 

I was awake most of the night but when morning came, I can’t remember going to sleep. I was thankful that the morning came. 

Interviewer:

So when the sun came up you were finally able to sleep? 

Jodie: 

Right. And that’s the whole day.

Interviewer: 

What an experience.

Jodie:

Yes. That was how the day played out. 

Interviewer:

So in the last memory, you’re falling asleep. The sun is coming out. Later on, you learned that your father had been admitted to the hospital. 

Jodie:

You know, I don’t really remember that. But I wouldn’t have liked him gone, because Dad…even though he was a horrible, horrible man, he was my only source of comfort. So I knew he was gone, because there was nobody for me to go to.  

Interviewer:

Even though he was a perpetrator, he was your protector in some ways.

Jodie:

Right. I always wanted my dad to come home because he gave me my nightmares, but he also comforted my nightmares. 

Interviewer:

You mentioned that the events of that day led to him becoming unconscious and ultimately led to what is referred to as a “diabetic coma”. Can you tell us a little bit about what causes those? 

Jodie:

Stress in a diabetic [can cause that]—we can go into that more in the next episode—but having not eaten. And I remember my father drinking beer that day too when we were up at the property. I remember beer being there. 

Yeah, not eating and all that.

Never in a time in his life was he ever admitted to the hospital for a diabetic coma where he stayed.

That time he stayed for seven days. And when I got the hospital records, which we’ll talk about again, those hospital records had him admitted, as I said, late at night. 

12:55 a.m. 

He was foaming at the mouth.  

He almost killed himself that day. 

Interviewer:

So, speaking of records, documents… you have acquired and built up quite a lot of supporting evidence that lays out exactly the events of this day. Like you mentioned, we will get into those in the coming episodes. Is there anything that you feel like you missed out on, that you want to add? 

Jodie:

I don’t think so. 

Interviewer:

How do you want to set up the next episode? 

Jodie:

I need help. What I am trying to do through this is there are trained people who understand these kinds of rooms. I’ve been in therapy, obviously, for 25 years of my life or better. So what I hope to do in the next episode is anybody viewing this, anybody watching, that can put some of these things together. I’ll give all the facts that I have. It took me some time. When I went to my family, my mom said if I got hospital records, I’d have the day of the murder.

I did get those hospital records, and that’s a story in and of itself, and with those that gave me the date of the murder and I entered that. It took me some time, a couple of years then, to find the missing person. Because I was looking in the wrong place. 

And so in our next episode, I’d like to go over all of those facts and have anybody who is listening offer some supporting help. Then I’ll go into the other guy who was in the room with us, Craig. He is still alive and I went and talked to him. I have a recording because my husband and I went up there and we recorded him. 

I want to play some of that as well where he just says, he tells me to let it go. 

And I don’t want to let it go. 

So that’s why I’m here. I need help. 

Interviewer:

Thank you.

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